These Brooklynites have broken from the trends of today's average rock band by infusing their music with brass instruments and non-stop energy. There is no doubt that CCATPH's sound is colorful, fun and infectious. It would be a mistake to overlook these guys.
Freeindie.com

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Surely one of the most entrancing and entertaining bands that I have seen, Country Club and their beloved Porn Horns manage a sextet of infinite possibilities. Their latest EP, "Friends Don't Make Forearms," (a title that inspires the most devilish grin) is a delightfully zany promenade that whips up the dickens in even the most complacent listener. Very intelligent compositions that transcend buzzword bands and do what music should; it makes you feel good. Witty lyricism and catchy choruses give way to brilliant harmonies and skillful instrumental breaks. Possessing all the talent and foolery that a band with Porn Horns might, Country Club has bestowed upon us a record that is a stunning amusement brimming with rock and roll beauty.
The Deli Magazine

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Country Club spits out high energy music with a melange of sounds and styles. The band's upbeat songs are instantly contagious and after listening to their latest EP, "Friends Don't Make Forearms," one wonders why horns aren't use more frequently in rock music nowadays.
Underrated Magazine

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The Porn Horns can turn an ordinary rock and roll groove into a seedy gangster shakedown in eight bars. Their solo moments are interesting and expressive, but when they play together, it's the musical equivalent of a heavyweight's roundhouse right.
NJ.com

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They have a horn section that rocks like Rocket From The Crypt's always wanted to. They have the same sexy, confident swagger David Lee Roth had in his prime. And they have a weird, cinematic uniqueness to them that doesn't sound like Mr. Bungle, but if Mr. Bungle were going to high-five any band, Country Club would be the one. THE GRADE: A+
Tastes Like Chicken

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Big guitars, bigger vocals and fat horns. Good songs for great times... this stuff must be great live. Hint, hint, hint.
Starr Tucker - New York Waste

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...a tight, sick blitz-rock sextet, [Country Club] blast through 38 unrelenting minutes of hard rock, rockabilly, punk, avant-rock, and surf music (plus a few bizarre and amusing phone messages from their onetime keyboard player). Their frenetic changes in tempo and musical style (not to mention the styles they choose to fuse) suggest Mr. Bungle, John Zorn, maybe Frank Zappa at times, and they have the chops to pull it off.
New Haven Advocate

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Country Club and the Porn Horns, besides playing some wicked, raucous ska-infused rock, rip through a killer version of Lee Ving's "New York's Alright (If You Like Saxophones)" on their new self-released LP, The Stationwagon Revolution.
Time Out

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After the rapid rise and fall of mainstream ska the music scene was awash with wandering, band-less horn sections. Recently these ronin brass players have begun to find themselves new niches. Enter Country Club & the Porn Horns, a Brooklyn based band that describes themselves as "Part sleazy power rock trio, part hard-and-heavy horn section." I would describe them as some odd mix of Reel Big Fish, The Reverend Horton Heat, and Alice Donut. But you should ignore both of these descriptions and listen to them yourself...
Lucid

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If the Rebirth Brass Band came from New York City instead of New Orleans, and if the members had been reared on punk rock instead of jazz, you'd have a group that sounds like Country Club & the Porn Horns.

The Brooklyn band bills itself as "part sleazy power-rock trio, part hard-and-heavy horn section," which aren't necessarily elements that should fit together well. They do, though, on the band's self-released debut, "The Stationwagon Revolution." Country Club is adept at churning out riff-centric, horn-laced rock 'n' roll ("Squeeze It In"), experimental jazz-rock ("Travel") and retro surf rock ("Wishing Well").
The Hartford Courant

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As incendiary as this album gets, my guess is that the show is ten times more impressive. And that's a truly frightening prospect.
Aiding & Abetting

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Creating impressive compositions that dance in and out of frame, raging with mood and complex tenacity, CCPH make for salacious nightclub material...even when you've heard the CD five times, it still stands out.
Hybrid Magazine

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Strange name? Strange band. Even stranger sound. Country Club & the Porn Horns sound like the kind of rock 'n' roll you sweat to. They're musically schizophrenic, but sharp enough to make it work. And they're no mere imitators. In one three-minute blast, Country Club & the Porn Horns can conjure up traces of Faith No More, Little Blue Crunchy Things (mostly in the horns), Hot Stove Jimmy, Fishbone, and Rancid Yak Butter Tea Party, while still sounding resiliently individual.
Tastes Like Chicken
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